Aligning with Winter

Winter time in Chinese medicine is when yin is plentiful relative to yang. Yin is cool, dark, inward, still, as opposed to yang which is warm, light, outward, and active. Winter is about conserving and storing energy. After the harvest in the fall, perennial plants must rest and replenish over the winter, so that they will not become depleted and will be productive again in the spring.

 

This is also how we should regard our bodies and minds in the winter.  The emphasis is on conserving, storing, and replenishing our energy for the upcoming year ahead. Some things we can do during winter to live according to the seasons are:

  • Rest more. Go to bed earlier and get up later. Sleep deprivation can tax our immune system and lead to illness. In winter we need even more sleep.
  • Focus on quieter activities like reading or meditating. Exercise is great of course, but don’t overdo it in winter.
  • Eat foods that are highly nourishing and in season, such as root vegetables, potatoes, squashes, winter greens, red and black beans, high protein meats, and hearty vegetable soups.
  • Eat more bone broth. Winter in Chinese medicine is the time that corresponds to the kidneys, and the kidneys govern the bones. Bone broth not only makes your bones strong and healthy, but it boosts our immune systems, reduces inflammation, and heals the digestive system. Its one of the most beneficial substances we can consume for health and longevity. You can find it in the soup section of your local health food store.
  • Minimize stimulation. During winter we should talk less, spend less time on the computer or watching TV, and in general conserve our physical, mental and even sexual energy. Doing so will allow us to have more resources available for the exciting growth and productivity that begins in the Spring.

All of these things will help nourish the kidneys–the root of life–and allow you to live a long and healthy life, say the ancients.  Living according to the seasons can help prevent health problems before they arise.

–Jesse Andreas, L.Ac.

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