Perspective: The Gift of Chinese Medicine     

As you can see from testimonials and our post “Why We Do What We Do,” Chinese Medicine can offer relief and hope for people with a wide variety of physical and emotional symptoms. And yet, it has become very clear over the past couple of months is that Chinese Medicine also offers something which can be equally as healing: a new perspective.
With it’s emphasis on taking action at the appropriate times and maintaining balance among opposing forces, CM reminds us that we don’t have to be moving all the time. Mary Saunders’ lovely little book, “Rhythms of Change,” describes how Chinese Medicine can inform and direct different phases of life. Adjusting our outlook, activities and energies to align with the seasons is one of the foundational tenets of Chinese Medicine.  It’s this perspective that I find so life-changing for those of us steeped in the current culture of “never-let-up, work harder, no matter what.”
Too many people have come in lately burdened by impossible expectations set by themselves and others. A stay-at-home mom exhausting herself with volunteer commitments, corporate employees being asked to work 12 hour days even through the holidays, folks pushing themelves to meet expectations of extended family. Winter is exactly the time to politely decline these invitations to over-extend ourselves.  The earth’s energy and ours is moving down and in now. While it’s natural to be more engaged and outgoing in Spring and Summer, doing so now is contrary to your body’s natural inclination. Too much work in the winter prevents the body from restoring itself and can lead to fatigue, illness and what some like to call “adrenal burnout.”
Use this season to re-evaluate how much you push yourself past your mental and physical limits.  In the long run, who is this serving? Take advantage of the cold weather to pull inward, conserve your energy and look deeply to decide what tasks you perform are truly necessary and/or energy-giving and which are simply too draining.
Following the same principle Marie Kondo presents in her bestseller, “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” ask yourself if the tasks, jobs, people to which you give energy  “Spark Joy?” If not, consider eliminating or down-sizing them. If you’re in a job you don’t enjoy, but feel dependent on it for income, find joy in the money it provides or a co-worker you have fun with. If it’s the house-cleaning that makes you crazy or the numerous social engagements on nights you’d rather stay in with a book…ask yourself which of those are truly necessary and which can be postponed or hired out or ignored altogether.
The bottom line is that rest and relaxation is important. It’s OK to do nothing sometimes. You don’t need to apologize for it. Only by taking a step back can the sculptor see what she’s creating.  Only by pulling nutrients down into the roots and sacrificing a few smaller branches can the tree survive winter to bloom passionately again in spring.

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